Aboriginal Cultural Education Hub

Build meaningful and respectful relationships with your Aboriginal colleagues, and learn more about our Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) and the role you play to support our 15 RAP commitments.

The Aboriginal Cultural Education Hub provides information, support and guidance on:

  • Aboriginal cultural awareness, initiatives and events
  • Progress updates on our RAP commitments and the role you play
  • Making Aboriginal people feel welcome and valued at Transport for NSW
  • Protocols for community consultation and meaningful engagement in programs and initiatives.

As custodians of Aboriginal culture, Aboriginal people alone possess the knowledge, skills and experiences to give authenticity to Aboriginal programs and initiatives. Building genuine partnerships and consulting Aboriginal people and communities is imperative to leveraging this expertise.

National Reconciliation Week 2020

National Reconciliation Week, Wednesday 27 May to Wednesday 3 June, is an annual event to commemorate two significant milestones in our country's history – the anniversaries of the 1967 referendum and the High Court Mabo decision.

Each year National Reconciliation Week celebrates and builds on the respectful relationships shared by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians.


Get involved

Here's a few ways to show your support for National Reconciliation Week 2020:


Build meaningful and respectful relationships with your Aboriginal colleagues, and learn more about our Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) and the role you play to support our 15 RAP commitments.

The Aboriginal Cultural Education Hub provides information, support and guidance on:

  • Aboriginal cultural awareness, initiatives and events
  • Progress updates on our RAP commitments and the role you play
  • Making Aboriginal people feel welcome and valued at Transport for NSW
  • Protocols for community consultation and meaningful engagement in programs and initiatives.

As custodians of Aboriginal culture, Aboriginal people alone possess the knowledge, skills and experiences to give authenticity to Aboriginal programs and initiatives. Building genuine partnerships and consulting Aboriginal people and communities is imperative to leveraging this expertise.

National Reconciliation Week 2020

National Reconciliation Week, Wednesday 27 May to Wednesday 3 June, is an annual event to commemorate two significant milestones in our country's history – the anniversaries of the 1967 referendum and the High Court Mabo decision.

Each year National Reconciliation Week celebrates and builds on the respectful relationships shared by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians.


Get involved

Here's a few ways to show your support for National Reconciliation Week 2020:


  • Two of us

    3 days ago

    Scott Hoskin is an STA bus driver and was recently appointed Aboriginal Liaison Officer. Christine Lithgow is Transport’s Acting Group General Counsel. The Aboriginal Career and Mentoring Program brought them together, but mutual trust and respect, shared interests and regular coffee catch ups, are sustaining their connection.

    Scott: I was looking for ways to improve my qualifications and try and further my career. I’d done a Cert IV in Training and Assessment, and I was at a bit of a stalemate of what to do next, so I thought I’d apply for the mentor program, to get some tips on career development. I was paired up with Christine.

    At the start of the program they told us, ‘Be open with your mentor.’ And so I was. My mum and uncle were part of the Stolen Generation, and my uncle went and fought in World War Two, but wasn’t recognised for his service when he came back. I told Christine about all of that and I think she was pretty interested in it. She’s a good listener. I also told her about a few Dreamtime stories that she didn’t know about, and I promised to show her a sacred site that is special to me.

    At the time of the program, I was applying for the position of Aboriginal Liaison Officer with STA. She was actually going through a similar process, applying for a new job herself. She helped me with the interviewing skills, what to say and what not to say, and what to wear.

    I’ve learned a lot from Christine. She’s given me lots of subtle advice for my new role, like how meetings work, minutes, general business, how to get something onto the agenda. All that stuff was a bit foreign to me, but Christine’s got a law background and she has staff under her as well, so she’s used to lots of meetings.

    We talk monthly – meet at Lee Street, get a coffee and have a yarn and talk about stuff. She’s good at building confidence – she told me I sold myself a bit short on my skills, so she’s going to help me build a LinkedIn page.

    With the new franchisees coming in to STA, I want to be ready. I know the bus business, I’ve got lots of experience and knowledge, and I think I’ve got something to offer. Christine’s support is giving me the confidence to put my hand up for new opportunities, when the time comes.

    Christine: I’ve always had an interest in Aboriginal culture and I wanted to be engaged in the process of reconciliation in some practical way. As well, through family history research I’ve learned a lot about Aboriginal connections with my own past, so I have always felt that there was an intersection with the Aboriginal community that I wanted to explore further.

    It was really lovely to meet Scott. I felt like we were well matched and we hit it off from the start. At the first session he was very open and shared a lot of things about his life and family that I felt really privileged to hear. He talked about the Stolen Generation and its impacts, all in relation to his own family’s experience.

    Scott and I have so many different experiences of life – some influenced by culture, others just by our different circumstances. He’s very knowledgeable about so many things – everything from the inner workings of Parliament House (where he used to work) to stories of the Dreamtime, and different sacred sites around Sydney. It’s been fascinating to hear and learn from him. It’s definitely inspired me to do some more research about the Aboriginal cultural origins of my own local area.

    Scott was in the process of applying for his role as Aboriginal Liaison Officer, and I really don’t think I helped him at all. He’s made it entirely on his own merits, wisdom, willingness to contribute and sense of fun and drive. I’m chuffed he thinks I did help! We definitely talked about how not to feel awkward with people in authority (something we both share!). But he’s a natural. Now that he’s in the role, Scott attends monthly meetings with other Transport people, including our Secretary, Rodd Staples.

    Since the formal program ended, we’ve continued to talk and meet regularly, and there are a few issues that we’re working through. I think the experience has helped Scott to demonstrate his ambition to the management of STA, and been a step for him on that pathway. But I honestly feel like I get as much out our connection as Scott does, and possibly more.

    I also think the mentoring program itself is fantastic. The cultural awareness sessions were very useful, and I learned a lot from other mentors as well. It was just great to be part of something so special.

    The next Aboriginal Career Development and Mentoring program is planned for later in 2020. To register your interest or to find out more, contact Mark Champley at mark.champley@transport.nsw.gov.au

    Scott Hoskin and Christine Lithgow

    Scott Hoskin is an STA bus driver and was recently appointed Aboriginal Liaison Officer. Christine Lithgow is Transport’s Acting Group General Counsel. The Aboriginal Career and Mentoring Program brought them together, but mutual trust and respect, shared interests and regular coffee catch ups, are sustaining their connection.

    Scott: I was looking for ways to improve my qualifications and try and further my career. I’d done a Cert IV in Training and Assessment, and I was at a bit of a stalemate of what to do next, so I thought I’d apply for the mentor program, to get some tips on career development. I was paired up with Christine.

    At the start of the program they told us, ‘Be open with your mentor.’ And so I was. My mum and uncle were part of the Stolen Generation, and my uncle went and fought in World War Two, but wasn’t recognised for his service when he came back. I told Christine about all of that and I think she was pretty interested in it. She’s a good listener. I also told her about a few Dreamtime stories that she didn’t know about, and I promised to show her a sacred site that is special to me.

    At the time of the program, I was applying for the position of Aboriginal Liaison Officer with STA. She was actually going through a similar process, applying for a new job herself. She helped me with the interviewing skills, what to say and what not to say, and what to wear.

    I’ve learned a lot from Christine. She’s given me lots of subtle advice for my new role, like how meetings work, minutes, general business, how to get something onto the agenda. All that stuff was a bit foreign to me, but Christine’s got a law background and she has staff under her as well, so she’s used to lots of meetings.

    We talk monthly – meet at Lee Street, get a coffee and have a yarn and talk about stuff. She’s good at building confidence – she told me I sold myself a bit short on my skills, so she’s going to help me build a LinkedIn page.

    With the new franchisees coming in to STA, I want to be ready. I know the bus business, I’ve got lots of experience and knowledge, and I think I’ve got something to offer. Christine’s support is giving me the confidence to put my hand up for new opportunities, when the time comes.

    Christine: I’ve always had an interest in Aboriginal culture and I wanted to be engaged in the process of reconciliation in some practical way. As well, through family history research I’ve learned a lot about Aboriginal connections with my own past, so I have always felt that there was an intersection with the Aboriginal community that I wanted to explore further.

    It was really lovely to meet Scott. I felt like we were well matched and we hit it off from the start. At the first session he was very open and shared a lot of things about his life and family that I felt really privileged to hear. He talked about the Stolen Generation and its impacts, all in relation to his own family’s experience.

    Scott and I have so many different experiences of life – some influenced by culture, others just by our different circumstances. He’s very knowledgeable about so many things – everything from the inner workings of Parliament House (where he used to work) to stories of the Dreamtime, and different sacred sites around Sydney. It’s been fascinating to hear and learn from him. It’s definitely inspired me to do some more research about the Aboriginal cultural origins of my own local area.

    Scott was in the process of applying for his role as Aboriginal Liaison Officer, and I really don’t think I helped him at all. He’s made it entirely on his own merits, wisdom, willingness to contribute and sense of fun and drive. I’m chuffed he thinks I did help! We definitely talked about how not to feel awkward with people in authority (something we both share!). But he’s a natural. Now that he’s in the role, Scott attends monthly meetings with other Transport people, including our Secretary, Rodd Staples.

    Since the formal program ended, we’ve continued to talk and meet regularly, and there are a few issues that we’re working through. I think the experience has helped Scott to demonstrate his ambition to the management of STA, and been a step for him on that pathway. But I honestly feel like I get as much out our connection as Scott does, and possibly more.

    I also think the mentoring program itself is fantastic. The cultural awareness sessions were very useful, and I learned a lot from other mentors as well. It was just great to be part of something so special.

    The next Aboriginal Career Development and Mentoring program is planned for later in 2020. To register your interest or to find out more, contact Mark Champley at mark.champley@transport.nsw.gov.au

    Scott Hoskin and Christine Lithgow

  • Partnering for participation

    4 days ago

    Policies like the Aboriginal Participation in Construction Policy (APIC) and the Aboriginal Procurement Policy set the framework for government agencies to create opportunities for Aboriginal-owned businesses and encourage Aboriginal employment and training through the supply chain of NSW government contracts.

    But at Sydney Metro, complying with the policy requirements is just the starting point. With bespoke Aboriginal Participation plans for each of its projects, and a dedicated team that’s involved right from the start, the approach is all about collaborating with industry at every point along the project to help get the best outcomes for Aboriginal people.

    Sonja Malcolm, Senior Manager Workforce Development and Capability at Sydney Metro, explains more.

    How would you describe Sydney Metro’s approach?

    We’re very passionate about the legacy our projects leave and about going above and beyond the policy drivers, to positively impact Aboriginal people and communities. We have a bespoke Aboriginal Participation plan for City South West (which we’re currently constructing) and we’ve already got plans for Greater West and West (not yet in construction). These plans form part of the business case, and our team is involved right from the start of the project. That’s very important.

    How do you support your contracting partners to achieve the best Aboriginal participation outcomes?

    We start off with a very contractual arrangement with clear expectations of what needs to be delivered, but then we partner with our contracting partners who are building Sydney Metro projects to help them achieve what we ask of them. That means meeting with them every month, and providing a whole suite of support that they can tap into – like industry funded training, pre-employment programs, mental health training, PPE, a whole range of things. So it’s very collaborative, very industry-informed, and very well supported. I think that’s a real point of difference for our projects.

    Construction is currently underway on the City and Southwest project. What are some of the results you’ve achieved so far?

    We currently have 457 Aboriginal people employed on that project, which is 2.5 per cent of the workforce. We have 33 Aboriginal apprentices and trainees, and 60 Aboriginal people who’ve joined the project through pre-employment programs.

    One of the numbers we’re most proud of is that 11 per cent of the small to medium enterprises in our supply chain are Aboriginal enterprises – supplying goods and services including construction, PPE, cleaners, training, cultural awareness, mentoring and support and employment services. When we started I don’t think we even had 3 per cent.

    How can services like pre-employment programs help improve participation?

    These programs support people who have significant barriers to employment by opening the door to opportunities they might not otherwise be able to access. To date the program has delivered 84% job outcomes with 48% of participants being Aboriginal people and more than 52% going on to complete apprenticeships and traineeships in civil construction and precast manufacturing. The program also worked with NSW Corrections to support a number of participants coming through the prisoner release program.

    How else do you encourage Aboriginal participation?

    We’ve held a number of industry briefings, where our principal contractors and their supply chains present the procurement opportunities coming up in the next six to 12 months. We invite Aboriginal businesses along to build connections with the contractors and promote their services and capabilities. We had about 150 Aboriginal businesses attend the last three forums that we ran. On the most recent forum, with Central Station contractors, we had six new Aboriginal businesses access the supply chain, as a result of the briefing.

    2019 Aboriginal Forum

    Find out more

    https://www.sydneymetro.info/workforce-development-and-industry-participation


    Policies like the Aboriginal Participation in Construction Policy (APIC) and the Aboriginal Procurement Policy set the framework for government agencies to create opportunities for Aboriginal-owned businesses and encourage Aboriginal employment and training through the supply chain of NSW government contracts.

    But at Sydney Metro, complying with the policy requirements is just the starting point. With bespoke Aboriginal Participation plans for each of its projects, and a dedicated team that’s involved right from the start, the approach is all about collaborating with industry at every point along the project to help get the best outcomes for Aboriginal people.

    Sonja Malcolm, Senior Manager Workforce Development and Capability at Sydney Metro, explains more.

    How would you describe Sydney Metro’s approach?

    We’re very passionate about the legacy our projects leave and about going above and beyond the policy drivers, to positively impact Aboriginal people and communities. We have a bespoke Aboriginal Participation plan for City South West (which we’re currently constructing) and we’ve already got plans for Greater West and West (not yet in construction). These plans form part of the business case, and our team is involved right from the start of the project. That’s very important.

    How do you support your contracting partners to achieve the best Aboriginal participation outcomes?

    We start off with a very contractual arrangement with clear expectations of what needs to be delivered, but then we partner with our contracting partners who are building Sydney Metro projects to help them achieve what we ask of them. That means meeting with them every month, and providing a whole suite of support that they can tap into – like industry funded training, pre-employment programs, mental health training, PPE, a whole range of things. So it’s very collaborative, very industry-informed, and very well supported. I think that’s a real point of difference for our projects.

    Construction is currently underway on the City and Southwest project. What are some of the results you’ve achieved so far?

    We currently have 457 Aboriginal people employed on that project, which is 2.5 per cent of the workforce. We have 33 Aboriginal apprentices and trainees, and 60 Aboriginal people who’ve joined the project through pre-employment programs.

    One of the numbers we’re most proud of is that 11 per cent of the small to medium enterprises in our supply chain are Aboriginal enterprises – supplying goods and services including construction, PPE, cleaners, training, cultural awareness, mentoring and support and employment services. When we started I don’t think we even had 3 per cent.

    How can services like pre-employment programs help improve participation?

    These programs support people who have significant barriers to employment by opening the door to opportunities they might not otherwise be able to access. To date the program has delivered 84% job outcomes with 48% of participants being Aboriginal people and more than 52% going on to complete apprenticeships and traineeships in civil construction and precast manufacturing. The program also worked with NSW Corrections to support a number of participants coming through the prisoner release program.

    How else do you encourage Aboriginal participation?

    We’ve held a number of industry briefings, where our principal contractors and their supply chains present the procurement opportunities coming up in the next six to 12 months. We invite Aboriginal businesses along to build connections with the contractors and promote their services and capabilities. We had about 150 Aboriginal businesses attend the last three forums that we ran. On the most recent forum, with Central Station contractors, we had six new Aboriginal businesses access the supply chain, as a result of the briefing.

    2019 Aboriginal Forum

    Find out more

    https://www.sydneymetro.info/workforce-development-and-industry-participation


  • How our mentoring program is building close and respectful relationships

    5 days ago

    During National Reconciliation Week 2020, we’ll be profiling some of the great projects across Transport that are working in partnership with Aboriginal communities.

    In 2016, Principal Opal Trainer Mark Champley was a mentee in Transport’s inaugural Aboriginal Career Development and Mentoring Program. Four years on, and around 70 graduates later, he’s an Associate for Diversity and Inclusion, helping to develop Transport’s fifth program.

    Mark explains that as well as supporting the growth and careers of Aboriginal people at Transport, the program is creating unique opportunities for mentors to develop greater cultural understanding of Aboriginal culture, protocols and beliefs.

    How did the mentoring program start?

    The idea was to bring aspiring Aboriginal leaders from across the cluster together with senior leaders, to help them to develop their careers through a structured mentoring program. We had 16 people in the first workshop, where the mentors and mentees met each other, and then met regularly over three months, to set goals, and identify and work on strengths and weaknesses. The model has been refined since then and we’ve now run four programs.

    Who can be a mentee, or mentor?

    We’ve had project officers, train drivers, station staff, a bus driver – mentees come from right across Transport. And a mentor can really be anyone who has a genuine interest in sharing their own career journey and supporting a colleague. How has the program changed over time? One of the early changes that we introduced was the idea of a commitment contract (which came from a colleague, Jacqueline Linke) – so that mentor and mentee could meet one-on-one first, decide if they could work together, and then commit to a partnership for the program. That’s proved to be very effective in developing shared expectations and building strong relationships.

    What’s been the biggest benefit of the program?

    One of the biggest benefits that we didn’t originally plan for, has been what I’d call reverse mentoring – the way that Aboriginal people have been able to share their culture, stories and ideas with their non-Aboriginal colleagues. The program offers multiple opportunities to extend cultural experience through storytelling, visiting community, attending screenings of aboriginal films, and attending Aboriginal events.

    For instance, I took my own mentor to an Aboriginal community meeting, which was a completely new experience for him. He’s left the business now, but we stay in touch, and he’ll sometimes ask my advice about issues that relate to Aboriginal people. For the fourth program, a number of the mentors went along to a boot camp run by a local Aboriginal charity group called Tribal Warrior, and ended up taking part in a yarning circle. So the influence definitely flows both ways and the shared experience helps both sides build close and respectful relationships.

    How would you describe the program’s results?

    Of the close to 70 people who have been mentees in the program, a third of them are now in more senior roles. There’s also lots of anecdotal evidence to tell us that it’s a positive influence. For instance, for one program, mentors and mentees went to a breakfast hosted by Elizabeth Mildwater (Deputy Secretary Greater Sydney). Apparently her message about courage and following your heart inspired one mentee to go back to her manager and accept a role that she’d previously declined, because she didn’t think she could do it.

    What’s next for the program?

    We’re planning another program later this year and hoping to have some of our earlier mentees back to act as mentors. It’s a fantastic program so I’d really encourage people to get involved.

    The next cohort of the Aboriginal Career Development and Mentoring Program is planned for later in 2020. To express your interest or to find out more, please contact mark.champley@transport.nsw.gov.au

    Tribal Warrior bootcamp session, with Transport mentors and mentees

    Back Row L to R – Mentor Olga Krikelis (Sydney Metro), Mentee Natalie Carr Mundine (Sydney trains), Mentor Sudath Amaratunga (TfNSW), Mentor Christine Lithgow (TfNSW), Mentor Jacqueline Linke (TfNSW), Mentor Glenn Johnston (Group Rail), Mark Champley (TfNSW) Front Row L to R Mentee Thomas Kelly (Sydney Trains now Sydney Metro) Mentee Jinaya Walford (TfNSW)

    Tribal Warrior bootcamp session held at the National Centre of Indigenous Excellence Redfern, with Transport mentors and mentees



    During National Reconciliation Week 2020, we’ll be profiling some of the great projects across Transport that are working in partnership with Aboriginal communities.

    In 2016, Principal Opal Trainer Mark Champley was a mentee in Transport’s inaugural Aboriginal Career Development and Mentoring Program. Four years on, and around 70 graduates later, he’s an Associate for Diversity and Inclusion, helping to develop Transport’s fifth program.

    Mark explains that as well as supporting the growth and careers of Aboriginal people at Transport, the program is creating unique opportunities for mentors to develop greater cultural understanding of Aboriginal culture, protocols and beliefs.

    How did the mentoring program start?

    The idea was to bring aspiring Aboriginal leaders from across the cluster together with senior leaders, to help them to develop their careers through a structured mentoring program. We had 16 people in the first workshop, where the mentors and mentees met each other, and then met regularly over three months, to set goals, and identify and work on strengths and weaknesses. The model has been refined since then and we’ve now run four programs.

    Who can be a mentee, or mentor?

    We’ve had project officers, train drivers, station staff, a bus driver – mentees come from right across Transport. And a mentor can really be anyone who has a genuine interest in sharing their own career journey and supporting a colleague. How has the program changed over time? One of the early changes that we introduced was the idea of a commitment contract (which came from a colleague, Jacqueline Linke) – so that mentor and mentee could meet one-on-one first, decide if they could work together, and then commit to a partnership for the program. That’s proved to be very effective in developing shared expectations and building strong relationships.

    What’s been the biggest benefit of the program?

    One of the biggest benefits that we didn’t originally plan for, has been what I’d call reverse mentoring – the way that Aboriginal people have been able to share their culture, stories and ideas with their non-Aboriginal colleagues. The program offers multiple opportunities to extend cultural experience through storytelling, visiting community, attending screenings of aboriginal films, and attending Aboriginal events.

    For instance, I took my own mentor to an Aboriginal community meeting, which was a completely new experience for him. He’s left the business now, but we stay in touch, and he’ll sometimes ask my advice about issues that relate to Aboriginal people. For the fourth program, a number of the mentors went along to a boot camp run by a local Aboriginal charity group called Tribal Warrior, and ended up taking part in a yarning circle. So the influence definitely flows both ways and the shared experience helps both sides build close and respectful relationships.

    How would you describe the program’s results?

    Of the close to 70 people who have been mentees in the program, a third of them are now in more senior roles. There’s also lots of anecdotal evidence to tell us that it’s a positive influence. For instance, for one program, mentors and mentees went to a breakfast hosted by Elizabeth Mildwater (Deputy Secretary Greater Sydney). Apparently her message about courage and following your heart inspired one mentee to go back to her manager and accept a role that she’d previously declined, because she didn’t think she could do it.

    What’s next for the program?

    We’re planning another program later this year and hoping to have some of our earlier mentees back to act as mentors. It’s a fantastic program so I’d really encourage people to get involved.

    The next cohort of the Aboriginal Career Development and Mentoring Program is planned for later in 2020. To express your interest or to find out more, please contact mark.champley@transport.nsw.gov.au

    Tribal Warrior bootcamp session, with Transport mentors and mentees

    Back Row L to R – Mentor Olga Krikelis (Sydney Metro), Mentee Natalie Carr Mundine (Sydney trains), Mentor Sudath Amaratunga (TfNSW), Mentor Christine Lithgow (TfNSW), Mentor Jacqueline Linke (TfNSW), Mentor Glenn Johnston (Group Rail), Mark Champley (TfNSW) Front Row L to R Mentee Thomas Kelly (Sydney Trains now Sydney Metro) Mentee Jinaya Walford (TfNSW)

    Tribal Warrior bootcamp session held at the National Centre of Indigenous Excellence Redfern, with Transport mentors and mentees



  • National Reconciliation Week – get involved

    5 days ago

    Today marks National Reconciliation Week which runs each year from 27 May to 3 June.

    National Reconciliation Week is an important part of our ongoing process of reconciliation, to strengthen the respectful relationships between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous peoples, for the benefit of all Australians.

    This year marks twenty years of shaping Australia’s journey towards a more just, equitable and reconciled nation, and the theme for National Reconciliation Week 2020 is ‘In this together’.

    Get involved

    We all have a responsibility to make reconciliation a reality. Be part of National Reconciliation Week and participate.

    The key event and activity to get involved in this National Reconciliation Week are:

    There are a number of activities happening across our divisions and agencies; these include:

    Wednesday 27 May

    • Flag raising ceremony at Brookvale and Port Botany STA depots
    • Stuart Mills talks about National Reconciliation Week
    • Sydney Region D&I Committee show of hands
    • Southern Region D&I Committee Art Challenge - register here
    • Watch Sydney Trains video featuring Uncle Widdy, as he shares his story about being a Stolen Generation survivor
    • Sydney Region Committee developed a National Reconciliation Week confluence site, focussed around the five dimensions of reconciliation

    Thursday 28 May

    • ROM Leaders Livestream (top 100 leaders): Acknowledgement of Reconciliation week and RAP update
    • NRW Webisodes streaming at selected locations or online
    • Participate in Sydney Train’s 5 step challenge

    Friday 29 May

    • Western D&I committee: hosting an MS Teams reconciliation event - register here.
    • Watch the webisode in STA tearooms

    Monday 1 June

    • Corporate Services all live National Reconciliation Week event
    • Watch the webisode in STA tearooms

    Tuesday 2 June

    • South West D&I committee: Aboriginal guest speaker via MS teams and take an online survey - register here
    • Watch the webisode in STA tearooms

    In addition, you can find a range of information and resources on each agency intranet.

    Reconciliation Australia activities

    During National Reconciliation Week we encourage you to keep learning, so head over to the Reconciliation Australia website and where possible participate in some reconciliation activities available like:

    Today marks National Reconciliation Week which runs each year from 27 May to 3 June.

    National Reconciliation Week is an important part of our ongoing process of reconciliation, to strengthen the respectful relationships between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples and non-Indigenous peoples, for the benefit of all Australians.

    This year marks twenty years of shaping Australia’s journey towards a more just, equitable and reconciled nation, and the theme for National Reconciliation Week 2020 is ‘In this together’.

    Get involved

    We all have a responsibility to make reconciliation a reality. Be part of National Reconciliation Week and participate.

    The key event and activity to get involved in this National Reconciliation Week are:

    There are a number of activities happening across our divisions and agencies; these include:

    Wednesday 27 May

    • Flag raising ceremony at Brookvale and Port Botany STA depots
    • Stuart Mills talks about National Reconciliation Week
    • Sydney Region D&I Committee show of hands
    • Southern Region D&I Committee Art Challenge - register here
    • Watch Sydney Trains video featuring Uncle Widdy, as he shares his story about being a Stolen Generation survivor
    • Sydney Region Committee developed a National Reconciliation Week confluence site, focussed around the five dimensions of reconciliation

    Thursday 28 May

    • ROM Leaders Livestream (top 100 leaders): Acknowledgement of Reconciliation week and RAP update
    • NRW Webisodes streaming at selected locations or online
    • Participate in Sydney Train’s 5 step challenge

    Friday 29 May

    • Western D&I committee: hosting an MS Teams reconciliation event - register here.
    • Watch the webisode in STA tearooms

    Monday 1 June

    • Corporate Services all live National Reconciliation Week event
    • Watch the webisode in STA tearooms

    Tuesday 2 June

    • South West D&I committee: Aboriginal guest speaker via MS teams and take an online survey - register here
    • Watch the webisode in STA tearooms

    In addition, you can find a range of information and resources on each agency intranet.

    Reconciliation Australia activities

    During National Reconciliation Week we encourage you to keep learning, so head over to the Reconciliation Australia website and where possible participate in some reconciliation activities available like:

  • National Sorry Day

    6 days ago

    Each year on 26 May, Australians acknowledge and recognise members of the Stolen Generations, as part of National Sorry Day.

    This is an annual event to remember, and reflect on, the forced removal of large numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, often called the ‘Stolen Generations’.

    It was on this day in 1997 that the Bringing Them Home report was tabled in Federal Parliament, two years after a national inquiry into the forced removal of Indigenous children was ordered.

    The Bringing them Home is the final report of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from their families and was conducted by the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission.

    This day is now commemorated as a time to remember, acknowledge and pay tribute to the members of the Stolen Generations. This significant day marks the first time that stories of being stolen were heard in a formal manner.

    Stolen Generation experience

    Watch Sydney Trains National Sorry Day video featuring Uncle Widdy, as he shares his story about being a Stolen Generations survivor.

    Message from our Secretary

    In his video message, Rodd Staples acknowledges the significance of Sorry Day, the importance of building relationships between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous Australians and our commitment to reconciliation.

    Hear his message.


    Each year on 26 May, Australians acknowledge and recognise members of the Stolen Generations, as part of National Sorry Day.

    This is an annual event to remember, and reflect on, the forced removal of large numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians, often called the ‘Stolen Generations’.

    It was on this day in 1997 that the Bringing Them Home report was tabled in Federal Parliament, two years after a national inquiry into the forced removal of Indigenous children was ordered.

    The Bringing them Home is the final report of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from their families and was conducted by the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission.

    This day is now commemorated as a time to remember, acknowledge and pay tribute to the members of the Stolen Generations. This significant day marks the first time that stories of being stolen were heard in a formal manner.

    Stolen Generation experience

    Watch Sydney Trains National Sorry Day video featuring Uncle Widdy, as he shares his story about being a Stolen Generations survivor.

    Message from our Secretary

    In his video message, Rodd Staples acknowledges the significance of Sorry Day, the importance of building relationships between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous Australians and our commitment to reconciliation.

    Hear his message.


  • Reconciliation Action Plan update

    12 days ago

    Following the launch of our Transport Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) last year, the RAP Project team have been working to create the frameworks and tools to support the implementation of our RAP across Transport.

    It's full steam ahead, as we start to design the strategies to support the delivery of the 15 commitments outlined in our RAP.

    The next phase of our RAP journey

    RAP Executive Sponsors and RAP Implementation Leads have now been identified. They are responsible for the support and implementation of the RAP commitments within their Division and Agency, and include:

    Division

    Executive Sponsor

    Divisional Implementation Lead

    ...

    Following the launch of our Transport Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) last year, the RAP Project team have been working to create the frameworks and tools to support the implementation of our RAP across Transport.

    It's full steam ahead, as we start to design the strategies to support the delivery of the 15 commitments outlined in our RAP.

    The next phase of our RAP journey

    RAP Executive Sponsors and RAP Implementation Leads have now been identified. They are responsible for the support and implementation of the RAP commitments within their Division and Agency, and include:

    Division

    Executive Sponsor

    Divisional Implementation Lead

    Greater Sydney

    Rachael Wheeler

    Howard Collins

    Glenn Johnston

    Regional and Outer Metropolitan

    Tom Grosskopf

    Giulia Joliffe

    Customer Strategy and Technology

    Jason Gordon

    Suzy Grierson

    Infrastructure and Place

    Pete Church

    Belinda Padovan – Court

    Corporate Services

    Matt Fuller

    Albert Bass

    People and Culture

    Tracey Taylor

    Troy Griffith

    Safety Environment and Regulation

    Bernard Carlon

    Amanda Talbott

    Prena Kapoor

    Office of the Secretary

    Jonathon Deans

    Michelle Hill

    Point to Point Transport Commission

    David Tooze

    Tathia Shield - Wells


    The role of RAP representatives

    RAP Executive Sponsors champion our RAP and ensure our commitments are on track, while the RAP Implementation Leads are responsible for the tactical implementation of RAP deliverables.

    Throughout May and July, our RAP Project team will host five co-design workshops with RAP Implementation Leads to establish cluster guiding documents which include:

    • Employment, Engagement and Development Strategy
    • Communications Strategy
    • Cultural Learning Strategy
    • Procurement Strategy
    • Cultural Heritage Consultation Framework
    • Aboriginal Arts Strategy


    These strategies and framework will bring consistency to how we action our commitments across Transport.

    Get involved

    The Implementation Leads will seek feedback and input to establish these strategies and framework - keep an eye out for communications from your Lead.



  • Our reconciliation achievements

    14 days ago

    The bushfires, floods and COVID-19 put a pause on the delivery of our Transport Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) frameworks and strategies. That doesn’t mean we haven’t made some great headway across Transport.

    Here’s what we’ve achieved:

    Buses to Bourke
    The Buses to Bourke program repurposes retired State Transit buses to help people get to work in regional NSW. So far, 150 people have obtained employment through this program.

    Woolgoolga to Ballina Songlines
    The Woolgoolga to Ballina is Australia’s largest regional infrastructure project and follows a number of traditional Songlines - the trade routes and ceremonial paths of Gumbaynggirr, Yaegl and...

    The bushfires, floods and COVID-19 put a pause on the delivery of our Transport Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) frameworks and strategies. That doesn’t mean we haven’t made some great headway across Transport.

    Here’s what we’ve achieved:

    Buses to Bourke
    The Buses to Bourke program repurposes retired State Transit buses to help people get to work in regional NSW. So far, 150 people have obtained employment through this program.

    Woolgoolga to Ballina Songlines
    The Woolgoolga to Ballina is Australia’s largest regional infrastructure project and follows a number of traditional Songlines - the trade routes and ceremonial paths of Gumbaynggirr, Yaegl and Bundjalung Nations.

    The Art Trail is a vision that tells the stories of the Songlines and creation stories by local Aboriginal artists. The artworks will be planned for 13 locations, including rest areas and bridge safety screens between Woolgoolga and Ballina.

    We’re now working with the local Aboriginal artists to tell their stories.

    Bark Canoe Project
    A creative way of engaging Aboriginal people in conversations about boating safety, through a collaborative effort to construct traditional bark canoes at Rozelle, Ballina and Wollongong.

    This innovative project was delivered by our Aboriginal Engagement Team, Maritime and Corporate Communications.

    Increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment
    Over the last three years, we’ve increased Aboriginal representation by 22% across the Transport cluster. We’ve done this by consulting with Aboriginal Employment Agencies, to target and identify recruitment opportunities.

    We’re also supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students with career pathways, through our NSW HSC Scholarship Program. Our scholarship program builds relationships with students in years 11 and 12, provides access to financial assistance, and practical work experience that aligns to their career aspirations.

    Since 2015, our 24-month Aboriginal VET Cadet program has supported 56 participants to complete both on the job development and a formal qualification. This program is designed to provide participants with the right capabilities and experiences to have a successful career in the Transport Cluster. At the moment, we’re in the process of recruiting an additional 10 Cadets for 2020.

    Acknowledgement of Stolen Generations
    Later this year, memorial plaques will be installed at train stations identified by the Stolen Generations Organisations (SGOs) as sites of importance to them including Cootamundra, Bomaderry, Parramatta, Wagga Wagga, Mittagong, Yass and Berry.

    There are also plans to tell the SGOs’ stories in the waiting room refurbishment on Platform 1, and a statue will be commissioned and erected at Central station.

    Next steps on our RAP journey
    We’re now transitioning into the Transport-wide implementation phase of our RAP. This phase will establish the RAP frameworks and strategies to ensure all areas across Transport have a united approach to delivering our commitments.

    Further details and updates about our RAP journey will be shared via the news section on the Aboriginal Cultural Education Hub.

  • Our Songlines are calling

    18 days ago

    We commissioned Yaegal woman Frances Belle Parker to create an artwork for our Reconciliation Action Plan. It shows the importance of traditional Songlines to Aboriginal people and their connection to our modern transport routes.

    In this video Frances shares the story behind her painting and what it represents.

    We commissioned Yaegal woman Frances Belle Parker to create an artwork for our Reconciliation Action Plan. It shows the importance of traditional Songlines to Aboriginal people and their connection to our modern transport routes.

    In this video Frances shares the story behind her painting and what it represents.

  • Six actions you can take to be more inclusive

    18 days ago

    At Transport, we want to build respect and understanding of Aboriginal culture and creating an inclusive environment. Learn about six actions you can take today, to be more inclusive of Aboriginal people.

    At Transport, we want to build respect and understanding of Aboriginal culture and creating an inclusive environment. Learn about six actions you can take today, to be more inclusive of Aboriginal people.