Stage 1 - Managing your pregnancy or adoption

Congratulations on your growing family!

How you react to this news will be unique to you, but you will definitely share with other expecting parents the knowledge that you are embarking on an exciting journey, whether this is your first time or one of many.

Transport supports you in this process, so it’s important you understand your entitlements and responsibilities. Stage 1 - Managing your pregnancy or adoption aims to ensure you are safe at work by providing information of leave entitlements, workload options and other useful resources.

Parental Leave

Transport recognises the importance of family responsibilities and provides parental leavepadlock and a range of flexible working optionspadlock for embarking on or returning from parental leave following the birth or adoption of a child.

A number of types of leave are available depending on your individual circumstances, including paid maternity leave, unpaid maternity leave, paternity leave and adoption leave.

Key features of our parental leave policy:

(refer to the relevant procedure for your agency for further details)

  • Primary caregivers who have given birth, adopted a child or adopted a child subject to a parentage order or equivalent (for adoption through surrogacy) are eligible for 12 months unpaid parental leave.
  • Primary caregivers can apply to extend their unpaid parental leave up to maximum of 24 months.
  • Support for the Commonwealth Paid Parental Leave (PPL) which provides eligible parents with payments at the rate of the National Minimum Wage for a maximum of 18 weeks.
  • Secondary caregivers are eligible for 8 weeks unpaid parental leave (short-term parental leave). Eligible staff receive one week paid leave included in the 8 weeks. Secondary caregivers can take this leave concurrently with the primary caregiver.
  • Annual leave taken with parental leave can be taken at half pay.
  • Special adoption leave: Staff who are adopting a child can use paid leave including FACSL to attend interviews involved with the adoption (also adoption through surrogacy). If paid leave is exhausted they can access two days unpaid leave.
  • Lactation breaks: Staff returning from Parental leave who are breastfeeding are entitled to 2 x 30 minute paid breaks to breastfeed or express milk. This includes access to a private space and refrigeration to store the milk.

Your responsibilities

  • Provide a medical certificate confirming your pregnancy and the expected date of birth.
  • Advise your manager and apply for parental leave at least 10 weeks before your leave starting date.
  • Complete Staying Connected Plan approximately 8 weeks before the start date of your parental leave and send to diversityandinclusion@transport.nsw.gov.au.

While many expectant mothers can carry on and work in the same capacity as they previously did, it is important to acknowledge that adjustments and changes are required to ensure you keep healthy and stay safe during your pregnancy. Staying safe at work also applies if you have adopted a child.

The changes may include changes to job duties, working hours, use of work equipment or the work environment. Your needs may change, so it is important to assess your situation regularly and if you are not sure of the impact of your work or work environment on your pregnancy or adoption, seek your medical practitioner’s advice.

If you are considering working the six weeks before the expected date of birth, your manager may ask you to provide a medical certificate which states whether you are fit for work and, if so, fitness to perform your normal duties.

If you are fit for work in the opinion of a registered medical practitioner, but potential illness or risks arising out of the pregnancy or hazards connected with the work assigned to you make it inadvisable for you to continue in your present work for a specified period, options will be explored to transfer you to a safe role at your substantive full rate of pay.

During your pregnancy you will need to consider your workload and make adjustments and changes to accommodate your needs. It is important to establish realistic expectations and regularly review these expectations to ensure they continue to meet your needs during your pregnancy.

Below are some tips to help you manage your workload and expectations.

  • Plan ahead for your day at work by scheduling meetings, time in your diary for specific tasks you need to complete and regular breaks
  • Don’t set unrealistic expectations for yourself and remember to slow down
  • Schedule time off for your medical appointments
  • Review your work duties and consider what work will need to be performed differently or by others
  • Work with your manager to implement the changes and adjustments you require and commit to regular reviews
  • Decide when you will go on leave and for how long
  • If you are feeling stressed or overwhelmed at work, have a conversation with your Manager
  • Discuss flexibility options with your manager. For example starting late and/or finishing early may save you some time commuting to work.

The checklist aims to remind you of some of the steps you need to take to manage your pregnancy and plan for your time at work while pregnant. It depends where you are in your journey and how long you have before you go on leave.

Download the checklist

‘Check in’ and see how you are going. You can also get some ideas of what you can do to ensure you are looking after your health and well-being during different stages of your journey.

Download the PDF version here

Beyondblue Pregnancy and new parents

The website offers information for new and expectant parents, covering everything from bonding with your baby to spotting the signs of anxiety and depression.

Centre of Perinatal Excellence (COPE)

Centre of Perinatal Excellence (COPE) is a not-for-profit organisation devoted to reducing the impacts of emotional and mental health problems in the pre and postnatal periods.

Raising Children Network

Raising Children Network is a complete resource for Australian parents, taking you from pregnancy to newborns to teenagers. The website offer evidence-based content you can trust on hundreds of topics about raising children and looking after yourself as a parent.

Books

Below is a list of books that you may find helpful. Choose what suits you and meets your reading expectations.

Congratulations on your growing family!

How you react to this news will be unique to you, but you will definitely share with other expecting parents the knowledge that you are embarking on an exciting journey, whether this is your first time or one of many.

Transport supports you in this process, so it’s important you understand your entitlements and responsibilities. Stage 1 - Managing your pregnancy or adoption aims to ensure you are safe at work by providing information of leave entitlements, workload options and other useful resources.

Parental Leave

Transport recognises the importance of family responsibilities and provides parental leavepadlock and a range of flexible working optionspadlock for embarking on or returning from parental leave following the birth or adoption of a child.

A number of types of leave are available depending on your individual circumstances, including paid maternity leave, unpaid maternity leave, paternity leave and adoption leave.

Key features of our parental leave policy:

(refer to the relevant procedure for your agency for further details)

  • Primary caregivers who have given birth, adopted a child or adopted a child subject to a parentage order or equivalent (for adoption through surrogacy) are eligible for 12 months unpaid parental leave.
  • Primary caregivers can apply to extend their unpaid parental leave up to maximum of 24 months.
  • Support for the Commonwealth Paid Parental Leave (PPL) which provides eligible parents with payments at the rate of the National Minimum Wage for a maximum of 18 weeks.
  • Secondary caregivers are eligible for 8 weeks unpaid parental leave (short-term parental leave). Eligible staff receive one week paid leave included in the 8 weeks. Secondary caregivers can take this leave concurrently with the primary caregiver.
  • Annual leave taken with parental leave can be taken at half pay.
  • Special adoption leave: Staff who are adopting a child can use paid leave including FACSL to attend interviews involved with the adoption (also adoption through surrogacy). If paid leave is exhausted they can access two days unpaid leave.
  • Lactation breaks: Staff returning from Parental leave who are breastfeeding are entitled to 2 x 30 minute paid breaks to breastfeed or express milk. This includes access to a private space and refrigeration to store the milk.

Your responsibilities

  • Provide a medical certificate confirming your pregnancy and the expected date of birth.
  • Advise your manager and apply for parental leave at least 10 weeks before your leave starting date.
  • Complete Staying Connected Plan approximately 8 weeks before the start date of your parental leave and send to diversityandinclusion@transport.nsw.gov.au.

While many expectant mothers can carry on and work in the same capacity as they previously did, it is important to acknowledge that adjustments and changes are required to ensure you keep healthy and stay safe during your pregnancy. Staying safe at work also applies if you have adopted a child.

The changes may include changes to job duties, working hours, use of work equipment or the work environment. Your needs may change, so it is important to assess your situation regularly and if you are not sure of the impact of your work or work environment on your pregnancy or adoption, seek your medical practitioner’s advice.

If you are considering working the six weeks before the expected date of birth, your manager may ask you to provide a medical certificate which states whether you are fit for work and, if so, fitness to perform your normal duties.

If you are fit for work in the opinion of a registered medical practitioner, but potential illness or risks arising out of the pregnancy or hazards connected with the work assigned to you make it inadvisable for you to continue in your present work for a specified period, options will be explored to transfer you to a safe role at your substantive full rate of pay.

During your pregnancy you will need to consider your workload and make adjustments and changes to accommodate your needs. It is important to establish realistic expectations and regularly review these expectations to ensure they continue to meet your needs during your pregnancy.

Below are some tips to help you manage your workload and expectations.

  • Plan ahead for your day at work by scheduling meetings, time in your diary for specific tasks you need to complete and regular breaks
  • Don’t set unrealistic expectations for yourself and remember to slow down
  • Schedule time off for your medical appointments
  • Review your work duties and consider what work will need to be performed differently or by others
  • Work with your manager to implement the changes and adjustments you require and commit to regular reviews
  • Decide when you will go on leave and for how long
  • If you are feeling stressed or overwhelmed at work, have a conversation with your Manager
  • Discuss flexibility options with your manager. For example starting late and/or finishing early may save you some time commuting to work.

The checklist aims to remind you of some of the steps you need to take to manage your pregnancy and plan for your time at work while pregnant. It depends where you are in your journey and how long you have before you go on leave.

Download the checklist

‘Check in’ and see how you are going. You can also get some ideas of what you can do to ensure you are looking after your health and well-being during different stages of your journey.

Download the PDF version here

Beyondblue Pregnancy and new parents

The website offers information for new and expectant parents, covering everything from bonding with your baby to spotting the signs of anxiety and depression.

Centre of Perinatal Excellence (COPE)

Centre of Perinatal Excellence (COPE) is a not-for-profit organisation devoted to reducing the impacts of emotional and mental health problems in the pre and postnatal periods.

Raising Children Network

Raising Children Network is a complete resource for Australian parents, taking you from pregnancy to newborns to teenagers. The website offer evidence-based content you can trust on hundreds of topics about raising children and looking after yourself as a parent.

Books

Below is a list of books that you may find helpful. Choose what suits you and meets your reading expectations.

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Page last updated: 15 January 2018, 11:51