Health advice and information

Everyone across Transport plays an important part in our response, both now and on the other side of this.

This page lays out important health information related to the Coronavirus and who is at risk, the vaccine, when to get tested as well as when to self-isolate.


On this page you’ll find...

Click on the below links to navigate this page:


Vaccine information

Australia’s COVID-19 vaccine roll-out is well under way. Currently, all people over the age of 12 are eligible for vaccination. COVID-19 vaccination is free and there are appointments available now at GPs, pharmacies and NSW Health vaccination clinics across the state.

You can use the COVID-19 Vaccine Eligibility Checker to see when you can get a COVID-19 vaccination, find out where, and book an appointment.

The NSW Government is strongly encouraging everyone to take up the vaccine as soon as they become eligible. At Transport we are keen to see as many of our people as possible vaccinated, especially those that are at increased risk of severe complications of COVID-19.

Please read more below on how Transport are supporting our people to be vaccinated or view our COVID-19 Vaccination FAQs for more information, including answers to common questions that have been asked in our COVID update livestreams.

For trusted and detailed health related COVID-19 vaccine information visit the NSW Health website, Australian Government Department of Health website or the Therapeutic Goods Administration website.

COVID-19 Vaccination Support Payment

Transport is providing a COVID-19 Vaccination Support Payment to all Award, Agreement and Senior Service employees, whether fixed term or permanent.

Regardless of the time of your vaccination appointment, you can apply to be paid two hours base pay (in addition to normal hours) to attend your vaccination appointment. You can apply for this payment twice, once for each dose of a COVID-19 vaccine that you receive.

To apply for the COVID-19 Vaccination Support Payment, after each of your vaccination appointments all you need to do is complete the Payment of COVID-19 Vaccine Request Form on MyTransport. The form will then be sent to your 1+ Manager for approval. You will receive payment in your next pay after your approved form is received and it will appear on your payslip. You should not record this claim on your timesheet or roster as it is not work time.

There are guidelines on when to book in for your vaccination and some requirements for people in safety critical roles or who work longer shifts. This information can all be found in our COVID-19 Vaccination FAQs.


Face masks

See mandatory mask wearing update FAQs.

The current Public Health Order requires masks to be worn in all indoor areas of non-residential premises such as retail, recreation and hospitality venues, and on public transport services and waiting areas. Under the Order the requirement to wear a mask in office buildings, for those who are fully vaccinated, has been removed. Anyone that is not fully vaccinated must continue to wear a face mask in all of our offices. You will need to continue to wear a mask in our office workplaces until you show your manager proof of being fully vaccinated. This can be done by showing your vaccination certificate or immunisation statement, available through Medicare or now on the Service NSW app. This comes as efforts are being stepped up to prevent further spread of COVID-19 in the community.

When to wear a mask

You are required to wear a mask when you are:

  • At a public transport waiting area, including at bus and light rail stops, rail platforms and across station precincts and interchanges
  • In a public transport vehicle, including a bus, train, taxi, or vessel being used to provide a public transport service
  • Whenever you are travelling on public transport, for example to and from work.
  • If you are not fully vaccinated - In all of our office workplaces.
  • Some key operational sites have specific mask wearing instructions to be followed. If you work at one of these sites, instructions around masks are provided on site.
  • Read our Transport FAQs on mandatory mask wearing here.

Please note - any person with an exemption to wearing a face covering under the Public Health Order is required to carry relevant evidence of the exemption on their person at all times to be provided to an enforcement officer should they need to prove an entitlement to the exemption. Read more about this in our Mask FAQs.

What type of mask to wear at work

While cloth masks can reduce transmission of respiratory droplets, research suggests that they are less efficient than surgical masks.

For this reason and to protect our people and customers, at Transport the wearing of disposable surgical masks are mandatory when indoors, in situations where you are required to wear a mask. Cloth masks are not permitted to be worn when indoors but can be worn when working outdoors. This is particularly important in our operationally critical locations such as signal boxes and the Rail Operations Centre and at all times where physical distancing is hard to maintain. Not only do surgical masks reduce the risk of transmission in our workplaces, they can help reduce the impact on our people when there is a positive case at work. For example by reducing the number of days you may need to isolate.

Surgical masks are available for your use at work at all our workplaces. You can order face masks for our sites and offices through completing the Critical Supply Request form. Please ensure you comply with the public health order to protect yourself and those around you. As well, to avoid fines which have increased under the new Police powers from $200 to $500.

Guidelines on wearing and using surgical masks

  • You may use a single-use surgical mask continuously for up to 4 hours, as long as it does not become moist, soiled or damaged.
  • Do not store and reuse single-use surgical masks.
  • For each new situation put on a clean single-use surgical mask. For example, you might wear a mask on public transport until you get to work. You shouldn't reuse the same mask during your journey home.
  • Carry clean masks in a paper or zip-lock bag with you.
  • Don’t touch the front of your mask while you are wearing or removing it. If you do touch it, wash or sanitise your hands.
  • If your single-use surgical mask gets soiled or damp, replace it with a new one.
  • Wash or sanitise your hands before putting your mask on or taking it off wherever practical and particularly if you have touched other surfaces in between.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with the mask and fit it snugly under your chin, over the bridge of your nose and against the sides of your face
  • Use the ear loops to remove and replace the mask if it is necessary to perform safety critical duties
  • Don’t allow the mask to hang around your neck or under your nose
  • Make sure you put disposable masks straight in the bin. Do not leave them lying around.
  • If you wear glasses, you can check out these tips for preventing your glasses from fogging up when wearing a mask.

Guidelines on disposing used surgical masks

Unfortunately disposable face masks and surgical masks are not recyclable, so it is important that Transport reduces the potential for pollution from inappropriate disposal of face masks. Once a face mask has been used:

  • Cut the ear loops with scissors to prevent entangling wildlife; and
  • Dispose of the face mask responsibly, preferably in a covered or enclosed bin.

Wash your hands straight after handling any items that may have been contaminated. Also wash your hands after touching your rubbish bin.

Check out this video with Dr Casolin on how to wear and adjust your mask.


When to get tested

There are a number of circumstances where our people may need to get tested and self-isolate. Find your nearest testing clinic here.

  • If you have a cough, a sore or scratchy throat, shortness of breath, loss of taste, loss of smell or a fever (37.5° or higher) you should stay away from work and get tested for COVID-19, even if your symptoms are mild.
  • You also need to get tested if you are directed to by NSW Health, a Transport contact tracer or a health professional. Keep up to date with the confirmed COVID-19 case locations and the NSW Health directions about what you must do if you have attended a venue during the times and dates specified.

When getting tested, request your results by SMS and if you are in a frontline role, identify yourself as a frontline Transport employee to help speed things up.

For more information on the different types of testing and how they apply to us at Transport please read the Testing fact sheet.


When to self-isolate

Self-Isolation is a crucial tool in NSW’s response to the Coronavirus. If you have any queries at all, please contact your manager.

People may need to self-isolate for any of the following circumstances. Please stay up to date with the latest advice from NSW Health.

  • You must self-isolate if you or a member of your household is diagnosed with COVID-19 or if instructed to do so by NSW Health after coming into contact with a confirmed case.
  • Close contacts: NSW Health will advise individuals of this – you should not be deciding this yourself.
  • Casual contact: If you are advised by NSW Health or a Transport contact tracer that you are a casual contact you need to get a COVID-19 test at your closest testing location (even if you don't have symptoms) and self-isolate until you receive a negative result.
  • Confirmed NSW Coronavirus locations: The list of Coronavirus case locations is constantly being updated so we encourage you to keep checking their website for the latest information. Please click here for the latest COVID-19 locations in NSW and follow the listed health advice if you have been at a location during the case date and time specified.
  • Employees tested for Coronavirus: All people tested for Coronavirus need to isolate until they receive their test results. This does not apply to people without symptoms who are tested under surveillance testing settings.
  • Critical service workers who need to cross the Victoria border: To cross the border for work, all passenger transport operators and people working in maintenance and the repair of critical infrastructure or construction need to apply for a permit. Under the permit conditions you will be required to self-isolate while not performing the critical service functions.

Please visit the NSW Health Self-isolation page for more information. You can also read more on the NSW Health Close Contact and Casual Contact fact sheets.


Those at risk

At this time, it is our priority to support our people and we know that the current community transmission has the potential to create particular anxiety for anyone who is at increased risk from COVID-19.

  • If you are at risk, your best protection at this time is to be vaccinated. All of our people who are at risk of severe complications are part of the priority vaccinations groups and we strongly encourage them to get vaccinated as soon as possible. People who are under a stay-at-home order are able to leave home to receive a vaccination.
  • If you are at risk and have been vaccinated, you should feel safe to come to work.
  • For our at risk people who are waiting to have their vaccination, safe alternative duties should be provided if the risk can’t be managed in their usual role because of the current outbreak. All efforts should be taken to do this.
  • If alternative duties are not possible, access to 20 days Special Leave can be provided while an at risk employee waits for vaccination.

We encourage our people who are at increased risk of severe illness from a COVID-19 infection to talk with their team leader about their circumstances. If you are a team leader, please take the time to assess and manage where possible, the risk of exposure to the virus for your people.

Who is at increased risk?

The Australian Government advice on people at risk of severe illness from a COVID-19 infection divides the increased risk into two categories:

  • Those who might be at high risk of severe illness from COVID-19 infection
  • Those who might be at moderate risk of severe illness from COVID-19 infection

Your risk of serious illness from COVID-19 increases if you are:

  • aged 70 years or over
  • Have a chronic medical condition
  • an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person aged 50 years and over who has a chronic medical condition
  • Immune suppressed

Based on this advice, we continue to encourage that a sensitive, common sense approach should be adopted when assessing the risk for employees with pre-existing medical conditions who have significant for concerns their wellbeing.

What are the working arrangements for ‘at risk’ staff?

People who are at increased risk should talk to their manager about their circumstances. Many of our people can perform their role from home and should do so, particularly where they are at greater risk of serious illness from Coronavirus.

For our frontline people who are not yet vaccinated, wherever possible, managers should:

  • Take steps to avoid having employees who are at higher risk work in customer-facing roles or where physical distancing is difficult or not possible.
  • Make arrangements to allow staff to remain at work in a safe environment by managing the risk of exposure of their people to the virus. This may include making changes to the work environment or providing alternative duties.
  • Focus on identifying meaningful work that can be done at home, even where those duties may not cover a full day or working week. Managers should explore all opportunities, such as:
    • Work that has been ‘on the back burner’
    • Any good ideas you haven’t had time to implement
    • Training or development activities
    • Other work available across different parts of the business that may align with the employee’s skill set.

Exploring these options helps to ensure our people remain engaged and connected to workplace.

To support people considered most at risk of severe illness from COVID-19 who haven’t received a vaccination, paid special leave of up to 20 days is available where adjustments cannot be made to the workplace or where people can’t work from home and the employee is awaiting a vaccination appointment. Managers can request reasonable evidence that the employee is seeking to be vaccinated, for example they can sight an employee’s vaccination appointment confirmation (there is no need to hold a copy).

Employees who do not wish to be vaccinated should talk to their team leader about other types of leave that may be available for them to take during the current health situation.

Leaders can contact their People Partner if they need further support.

Support for employees who are caring for people who are ‘at risk’

Employees can access special leave if they are unable to work from home and are required to care for a family member who is at risk and cannot attend their usual caring or educational facility.

Employees should discuss their particular circumstances with their manager and evidence should be provided to confirm the at risk status of the family member. Special leave does not apply where an employee is providing support to at risk people, such as shopping for elderly parents.

Precautions to take when living with people who are ‘at risk’

There are some sensible tips from NSW Health in their Home Isolation guidance that can be applied when living with someone ‘at risk’ to help prevent the spread of the virus.

This includes practical advice on separating yourself from others in the house and practising good hand hygiene, such as:

  • not sharing a room with people who are at risk of severe disease
  • using a separate bathroom, if available
  • avoiding shared or communal areas
  • washing hands before entering an area used by other people, after using the bathroom and after coughing or sneezing.

What can I do to protect myself and others?

The most important action we can take right now is to help stop the spread of infection. By following the four lines of defence listed below, we can all set an example for the community and do our bit to protect our customers, each other and the community:

  • Stay at home if you feel unwell
  • Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or use alcohol-based hand sanitiser if hand-washing facilities are not available
  • Practise physical distancing wherever possible
  • Wear wear a face mask where mandatory and outdoors where physical distancing is difficult

Managing and reporting cases

If you are advised of a confirmed COVID-19 case affecting an employee or contractor please immediately complete the COVID-19 Positive Case Report form (24 hours).

For next steps follow the Positive Employee flowchart and use the NSW Health contact risk assessment for community and workplace settings to guide you. These can all be found in the quick reference guide to reporting and communicating cases.

The following procedure gives further guidance on managing and reporting suspected and confirmed cases of Coronavirus across the Transport cluster.

COVID-19 - Managing and reporting cases procedure

When can an employee return to work after testing positive to Coronavirus?

When an employee can return to work after testing positive to Coronavirus is dependent on the severity of the case and the treatment. Regardless of the situation, an isolation period will be determined by NSW Health.

One of the following options will determine when an employee who has been diagnosed as having Coronavirus can return to work:

  • If they were asymptomatic, once at least 10 days in isolation have passed from the first positive test and no symptoms have developed during this period;
  • If they were not treated in hospital, they will need to wait at least 10 days after symptoms began and have been free of symptoms for at least 72 hours;
  • If they were treated in hospital, they must wait 10 days after the hospital discharge and have been free of symptoms for at least 72 hours; or
  • Once they have been fever-free for the previous 48 hours, there has been a resolution to any severe illness, 7 days have passed since the symptoms began, and they have returned a negative test result.

If a person who meets one of the above mentioned criteria is additionally swabbed and tests positive, then the person can still return to work. This is based on current evidence from the literature and Australian public health experience that suggests these people are unlikely to be infectious.

Someone who has completed the isolation period and has returned to work should still adhere to hygiene and physical distancing measures, as the extent of acquired immunity is currently unknown.

I am aware that my team member has not complied with requirements to be absent from the workplace due to illness or for the purposes of self-isolation and attends work. What should I do?

Leaders must direct employees who are obviously unwell or those required to self-isolate to go home and seek appropriate medical advice.

Details of confirmed COVID-19 cases

For details of the number of confirmed Coronavirus cases in the Transport cluster, please click here.

Everyone across Transport plays an important part in our response, both now and on the other side of this.

This page lays out important health information related to the Coronavirus and who is at risk, the vaccine, when to get tested as well as when to self-isolate.


On this page you’ll find...

Click on the below links to navigate this page:


Vaccine information

Australia’s COVID-19 vaccine roll-out is well under way. Currently, all people over the age of 12 are eligible for vaccination. COVID-19 vaccination is free and there are appointments available now at GPs, pharmacies and NSW Health vaccination clinics across the state.

You can use the COVID-19 Vaccine Eligibility Checker to see when you can get a COVID-19 vaccination, find out where, and book an appointment.

The NSW Government is strongly encouraging everyone to take up the vaccine as soon as they become eligible. At Transport we are keen to see as many of our people as possible vaccinated, especially those that are at increased risk of severe complications of COVID-19.

Please read more below on how Transport are supporting our people to be vaccinated or view our COVID-19 Vaccination FAQs for more information, including answers to common questions that have been asked in our COVID update livestreams.

For trusted and detailed health related COVID-19 vaccine information visit the NSW Health website, Australian Government Department of Health website or the Therapeutic Goods Administration website.

COVID-19 Vaccination Support Payment

Transport is providing a COVID-19 Vaccination Support Payment to all Award, Agreement and Senior Service employees, whether fixed term or permanent.

Regardless of the time of your vaccination appointment, you can apply to be paid two hours base pay (in addition to normal hours) to attend your vaccination appointment. You can apply for this payment twice, once for each dose of a COVID-19 vaccine that you receive.

To apply for the COVID-19 Vaccination Support Payment, after each of your vaccination appointments all you need to do is complete the Payment of COVID-19 Vaccine Request Form on MyTransport. The form will then be sent to your 1+ Manager for approval. You will receive payment in your next pay after your approved form is received and it will appear on your payslip. You should not record this claim on your timesheet or roster as it is not work time.

There are guidelines on when to book in for your vaccination and some requirements for people in safety critical roles or who work longer shifts. This information can all be found in our COVID-19 Vaccination FAQs.


Face masks

See mandatory mask wearing update FAQs.

The current Public Health Order requires masks to be worn in all indoor areas of non-residential premises such as retail, recreation and hospitality venues, and on public transport services and waiting areas. Under the Order the requirement to wear a mask in office buildings, for those who are fully vaccinated, has been removed. Anyone that is not fully vaccinated must continue to wear a face mask in all of our offices. You will need to continue to wear a mask in our office workplaces until you show your manager proof of being fully vaccinated. This can be done by showing your vaccination certificate or immunisation statement, available through Medicare or now on the Service NSW app. This comes as efforts are being stepped up to prevent further spread of COVID-19 in the community.

When to wear a mask

You are required to wear a mask when you are:

  • At a public transport waiting area, including at bus and light rail stops, rail platforms and across station precincts and interchanges
  • In a public transport vehicle, including a bus, train, taxi, or vessel being used to provide a public transport service
  • Whenever you are travelling on public transport, for example to and from work.
  • If you are not fully vaccinated - In all of our office workplaces.
  • Some key operational sites have specific mask wearing instructions to be followed. If you work at one of these sites, instructions around masks are provided on site.
  • Read our Transport FAQs on mandatory mask wearing here.

Please note - any person with an exemption to wearing a face covering under the Public Health Order is required to carry relevant evidence of the exemption on their person at all times to be provided to an enforcement officer should they need to prove an entitlement to the exemption. Read more about this in our Mask FAQs.

What type of mask to wear at work

While cloth masks can reduce transmission of respiratory droplets, research suggests that they are less efficient than surgical masks.

For this reason and to protect our people and customers, at Transport the wearing of disposable surgical masks are mandatory when indoors, in situations where you are required to wear a mask. Cloth masks are not permitted to be worn when indoors but can be worn when working outdoors. This is particularly important in our operationally critical locations such as signal boxes and the Rail Operations Centre and at all times where physical distancing is hard to maintain. Not only do surgical masks reduce the risk of transmission in our workplaces, they can help reduce the impact on our people when there is a positive case at work. For example by reducing the number of days you may need to isolate.

Surgical masks are available for your use at work at all our workplaces. You can order face masks for our sites and offices through completing the Critical Supply Request form. Please ensure you comply with the public health order to protect yourself and those around you. As well, to avoid fines which have increased under the new Police powers from $200 to $500.

Guidelines on wearing and using surgical masks

  • You may use a single-use surgical mask continuously for up to 4 hours, as long as it does not become moist, soiled or damaged.
  • Do not store and reuse single-use surgical masks.
  • For each new situation put on a clean single-use surgical mask. For example, you might wear a mask on public transport until you get to work. You shouldn't reuse the same mask during your journey home.
  • Carry clean masks in a paper or zip-lock bag with you.
  • Don’t touch the front of your mask while you are wearing or removing it. If you do touch it, wash or sanitise your hands.
  • If your single-use surgical mask gets soiled or damp, replace it with a new one.
  • Wash or sanitise your hands before putting your mask on or taking it off wherever practical and particularly if you have touched other surfaces in between.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with the mask and fit it snugly under your chin, over the bridge of your nose and against the sides of your face
  • Use the ear loops to remove and replace the mask if it is necessary to perform safety critical duties
  • Don’t allow the mask to hang around your neck or under your nose
  • Make sure you put disposable masks straight in the bin. Do not leave them lying around.
  • If you wear glasses, you can check out these tips for preventing your glasses from fogging up when wearing a mask.

Guidelines on disposing used surgical masks

Unfortunately disposable face masks and surgical masks are not recyclable, so it is important that Transport reduces the potential for pollution from inappropriate disposal of face masks. Once a face mask has been used:

  • Cut the ear loops with scissors to prevent entangling wildlife; and
  • Dispose of the face mask responsibly, preferably in a covered or enclosed bin.

Wash your hands straight after handling any items that may have been contaminated. Also wash your hands after touching your rubbish bin.

Check out this video with Dr Casolin on how to wear and adjust your mask.


When to get tested

There are a number of circumstances where our people may need to get tested and self-isolate. Find your nearest testing clinic here.

  • If you have a cough, a sore or scratchy throat, shortness of breath, loss of taste, loss of smell or a fever (37.5° or higher) you should stay away from work and get tested for COVID-19, even if your symptoms are mild.
  • You also need to get tested if you are directed to by NSW Health, a Transport contact tracer or a health professional. Keep up to date with the confirmed COVID-19 case locations and the NSW Health directions about what you must do if you have attended a venue during the times and dates specified.

When getting tested, request your results by SMS and if you are in a frontline role, identify yourself as a frontline Transport employee to help speed things up.

For more information on the different types of testing and how they apply to us at Transport please read the Testing fact sheet.


When to self-isolate

Self-Isolation is a crucial tool in NSW’s response to the Coronavirus. If you have any queries at all, please contact your manager.

People may need to self-isolate for any of the following circumstances. Please stay up to date with the latest advice from NSW Health.

  • You must self-isolate if you or a member of your household is diagnosed with COVID-19 or if instructed to do so by NSW Health after coming into contact with a confirmed case.
  • Close contacts: NSW Health will advise individuals of this – you should not be deciding this yourself.
  • Casual contact: If you are advised by NSW Health or a Transport contact tracer that you are a casual contact you need to get a COVID-19 test at your closest testing location (even if you don't have symptoms) and self-isolate until you receive a negative result.
  • Confirmed NSW Coronavirus locations: The list of Coronavirus case locations is constantly being updated so we encourage you to keep checking their website for the latest information. Please click here for the latest COVID-19 locations in NSW and follow the listed health advice if you have been at a location during the case date and time specified.
  • Employees tested for Coronavirus: All people tested for Coronavirus need to isolate until they receive their test results. This does not apply to people without symptoms who are tested under surveillance testing settings.
  • Critical service workers who need to cross the Victoria border: To cross the border for work, all passenger transport operators and people working in maintenance and the repair of critical infrastructure or construction need to apply for a permit. Under the permit conditions you will be required to self-isolate while not performing the critical service functions.

Please visit the NSW Health Self-isolation page for more information. You can also read more on the NSW Health Close Contact and Casual Contact fact sheets.


Those at risk

At this time, it is our priority to support our people and we know that the current community transmission has the potential to create particular anxiety for anyone who is at increased risk from COVID-19.

  • If you are at risk, your best protection at this time is to be vaccinated. All of our people who are at risk of severe complications are part of the priority vaccinations groups and we strongly encourage them to get vaccinated as soon as possible. People who are under a stay-at-home order are able to leave home to receive a vaccination.
  • If you are at risk and have been vaccinated, you should feel safe to come to work.
  • For our at risk people who are waiting to have their vaccination, safe alternative duties should be provided if the risk can’t be managed in their usual role because of the current outbreak. All efforts should be taken to do this.
  • If alternative duties are not possible, access to 20 days Special Leave can be provided while an at risk employee waits for vaccination.

We encourage our people who are at increased risk of severe illness from a COVID-19 infection to talk with their team leader about their circumstances. If you are a team leader, please take the time to assess and manage where possible, the risk of exposure to the virus for your people.

Who is at increased risk?

The Australian Government advice on people at risk of severe illness from a COVID-19 infection divides the increased risk into two categories:

  • Those who might be at high risk of severe illness from COVID-19 infection
  • Those who might be at moderate risk of severe illness from COVID-19 infection

Your risk of serious illness from COVID-19 increases if you are:

  • aged 70 years or over
  • Have a chronic medical condition
  • an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person aged 50 years and over who has a chronic medical condition
  • Immune suppressed

Based on this advice, we continue to encourage that a sensitive, common sense approach should be adopted when assessing the risk for employees with pre-existing medical conditions who have significant for concerns their wellbeing.

What are the working arrangements for ‘at risk’ staff?

People who are at increased risk should talk to their manager about their circumstances. Many of our people can perform their role from home and should do so, particularly where they are at greater risk of serious illness from Coronavirus.

For our frontline people who are not yet vaccinated, wherever possible, managers should:

  • Take steps to avoid having employees who are at higher risk work in customer-facing roles or where physical distancing is difficult or not possible.
  • Make arrangements to allow staff to remain at work in a safe environment by managing the risk of exposure of their people to the virus. This may include making changes to the work environment or providing alternative duties.
  • Focus on identifying meaningful work that can be done at home, even where those duties may not cover a full day or working week. Managers should explore all opportunities, such as:
    • Work that has been ‘on the back burner’
    • Any good ideas you haven’t had time to implement
    • Training or development activities
    • Other work available across different parts of the business that may align with the employee’s skill set.

Exploring these options helps to ensure our people remain engaged and connected to workplace.

To support people considered most at risk of severe illness from COVID-19 who haven’t received a vaccination, paid special leave of up to 20 days is available where adjustments cannot be made to the workplace or where people can’t work from home and the employee is awaiting a vaccination appointment. Managers can request reasonable evidence that the employee is seeking to be vaccinated, for example they can sight an employee’s vaccination appointment confirmation (there is no need to hold a copy).

Employees who do not wish to be vaccinated should talk to their team leader about other types of leave that may be available for them to take during the current health situation.

Leaders can contact their People Partner if they need further support.

Support for employees who are caring for people who are ‘at risk’

Employees can access special leave if they are unable to work from home and are required to care for a family member who is at risk and cannot attend their usual caring or educational facility.

Employees should discuss their particular circumstances with their manager and evidence should be provided to confirm the at risk status of the family member. Special leave does not apply where an employee is providing support to at risk people, such as shopping for elderly parents.

Precautions to take when living with people who are ‘at risk’

There are some sensible tips from NSW Health in their Home Isolation guidance that can be applied when living with someone ‘at risk’ to help prevent the spread of the virus.

This includes practical advice on separating yourself from others in the house and practising good hand hygiene, such as:

  • not sharing a room with people who are at risk of severe disease
  • using a separate bathroom, if available
  • avoiding shared or communal areas
  • washing hands before entering an area used by other people, after using the bathroom and after coughing or sneezing.

What can I do to protect myself and others?

The most important action we can take right now is to help stop the spread of infection. By following the four lines of defence listed below, we can all set an example for the community and do our bit to protect our customers, each other and the community:

  • Stay at home if you feel unwell
  • Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, or use alcohol-based hand sanitiser if hand-washing facilities are not available
  • Practise physical distancing wherever possible
  • Wear wear a face mask where mandatory and outdoors where physical distancing is difficult

Managing and reporting cases

If you are advised of a confirmed COVID-19 case affecting an employee or contractor please immediately complete the COVID-19 Positive Case Report form (24 hours).

For next steps follow the Positive Employee flowchart and use the NSW Health contact risk assessment for community and workplace settings to guide you. These can all be found in the quick reference guide to reporting and communicating cases.

The following procedure gives further guidance on managing and reporting suspected and confirmed cases of Coronavirus across the Transport cluster.

COVID-19 - Managing and reporting cases procedure

When can an employee return to work after testing positive to Coronavirus?

When an employee can return to work after testing positive to Coronavirus is dependent on the severity of the case and the treatment. Regardless of the situation, an isolation period will be determined by NSW Health.

One of the following options will determine when an employee who has been diagnosed as having Coronavirus can return to work:

  • If they were asymptomatic, once at least 10 days in isolation have passed from the first positive test and no symptoms have developed during this period;
  • If they were not treated in hospital, they will need to wait at least 10 days after symptoms began and have been free of symptoms for at least 72 hours;
  • If they were treated in hospital, they must wait 10 days after the hospital discharge and have been free of symptoms for at least 72 hours; or
  • Once they have been fever-free for the previous 48 hours, there has been a resolution to any severe illness, 7 days have passed since the symptoms began, and they have returned a negative test result.

If a person who meets one of the above mentioned criteria is additionally swabbed and tests positive, then the person can still return to work. This is based on current evidence from the literature and Australian public health experience that suggests these people are unlikely to be infectious.

Someone who has completed the isolation period and has returned to work should still adhere to hygiene and physical distancing measures, as the extent of acquired immunity is currently unknown.

I am aware that my team member has not complied with requirements to be absent from the workplace due to illness or for the purposes of self-isolation and attends work. What should I do?

Leaders must direct employees who are obviously unwell or those required to self-isolate to go home and seek appropriate medical advice.

Details of confirmed COVID-19 cases

For details of the number of confirmed Coronavirus cases in the Transport cluster, please click here.

Page last updated: 02 November 2021, 18:52