We're using goats to manage weed control - no kidding!

32 goats have been released onto one of our vacant properties in Berry to manage weeds and bushfire risks.

The Property Strategy & Planning Land Management team developed the pilot program to find alternatives to the use of traditional chemical herbicides for weed control. Goats will happily eat a variety of weeds such as blackberry, lantana and camphor laurel, with the seeds sterilised in their guts so they will not be spread.

Camille Bonnot, Senior Project Officer and project advocate said, “The property is adjacent to a biodiversity offset site – similar to other programs in place around the world, the goats provide an environmentally friendly and also cost effective land management solution next to this sensitive site.”

The originally feral herd of goats was mustered in the ACT, and then domesticated by a farmer in Wangaratta. The goats will stay on site for four to five months as part of the pilot.


32 goats have been released onto one of our vacant properties in Berry to manage weeds and bushfire risks.

The Property Strategy & Planning Land Management team developed the pilot program to find alternatives to the use of traditional chemical herbicides for weed control. Goats will happily eat a variety of weeds such as blackberry, lantana and camphor laurel, with the seeds sterilised in their guts so they will not be spread.

Camille Bonnot, Senior Project Officer and project advocate said, “The property is adjacent to a biodiversity offset site – similar to other programs in place around the world, the goats provide an environmentally friendly and also cost effective land management solution next to this sensitive site.”

The originally feral herd of goats was mustered in the ACT, and then domesticated by a farmer in Wangaratta. The goats will stay on site for four to five months as part of the pilot.