Heritage Digital Academy: Module 1

Welcome to Module 1: About the course


Purpose statement/objective

This course aims to equip participants with the required knowledge and skills to incorporate heritage management practice into planning of works affecting heritage-listed buildings, structures and their surrounds.

Target audience

Middle management and construction professionals such as project managers, individuals involved in strategic asset management decisions, staff conducting project procurement, contract mangers and construction project and site management.

Learners seeking entry to this course are expected to be in a position of authority in regards to project autonomy and/or decision making.

Prerequisites

This course does not have any prerequisites.

Completion commitment

Learners must commit to complete all course requirements (including assessment) within 4 weeks of date of enrolment.

Learning outcomes

At the end of the course, participants will have learned how to:

  • Identify heritage considerations for project integration
  • Identify project opportunities and constraints
  • Plan for heritage compliance
  • Plan for the evaluation of the project’s heritage management.

Assessment strategy

This course has two assessment pathways:

Pathway 1: Learners who have access to a current heritage project

  • Knowledge Assessments
  • Portfolio of Evidence (collection of evidence from current project)
  • Interview with Assessor.

Pathway 2: Learners who do not access to a current heritage project

  • Knowledge Assessments
  • MyProject (structured scenario-based assignment)
  • Interview with Assessor.

You will need to choose which assessment pathway best suits you in your current role and workplace.

Relationship to competency standards

At the successful completion of this course and all assessment requirements, learners will be issued with 10818NAT Apply heritage supervision to project planning.

Learning Pathway

[Insert Learning Pathway here]

We have designed a Learning Pathway for you that enables you to study when and where suits you.


Available support

XXXXXXX


Further information about this course can be found in the Participant Information Handbook. Download it here.

[Insert Participant Information Handbook here]




Why are we here?

Transport for NSW (TfNSW) owns or cares for a large and diverse range of assets (bridges, roads, buildings) which may be of historical significance to the people of NSW.

TfNSW will identify, assess and manage the cultural heritage it owns, controls or affects in accordance with relevant NSW and Federal legislation and will ensure that it is managed and conserved in accordance with its heritage significance.

We are here because some projects have been managed to world class standards BUT there are currently too many heritage incidents (many of which are notifiable to regulators) resulting in:

  • Irreparable damage to sensitive heritage assets
  • Significant financial costs from severe penalties, legal fees, rehabilitation and clean-up etc.
  • Significant reputational damage and poor customer service
  • Legal liability of Roads and Maritime
  • Personal and professional liability of PM’s and employees
  • Stopping or delays to critical works, and poor performance
  • Many PM’s are not fully aware of their heritage obligations/responsibilities, ‘what to do’ and ‘who to go to’
  • Safety is generally well documented and managed by PM’s, but heritage is often a last thought, creating inefficiencies and significant risks to Sydney Trains and employees.

As a TfNSW employee or contractor, you have a number of legal and professional obligations to protect our heritage. We will be exploring these obligations later today.

Let’s look at a few recent heritage incidents:



Incident 1: XXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX



Incident 2: XXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX





Our impact on heritage

TfNSW activities impact on heritage in the following ways:

1. As an owner of heritage assets

Images: The Sydney Harbour Bridge, Great North Road (convict built), Lady Darling Shipwreck (1880).



Did you know?
NSW Maritime controls 13 listed shipwrecks in Sydney Harbour and Newcastle Harbour.


2. As a developer.

Images: Light Rail construction at George Street and Randwick Stabling Yard.



Did you know?
Over 22, 000 artefacts have been found during Light Rail construction at the Randwick Stabling Yard.




What is heritage?

We all have a personal heritage of places and things that are special to us and our families and friends. The same quality of attachment applies to places valued by our local community, our state, our country and even the whole world. Heritage consists of those things we have inherited and want to keep. These places and objects give us a sense of the past and of our cultural identity. They are the things we want to protect and pass on to future generations so that they too will understand what came before them.

In Australia there are two basic categories of heritage items:

  • Natural
  • Cultural.

Natural heritage refers to the physical forms of the terrestrial and maritime environment. Cultural heritage encompasses the historical evidence, artefacts and beliefs of:

  • Aboriginal peoples
  • People who have had contact with the Australian continent
  • People who have been born here or who have settled here.

Although the distinction between natural and cultural appears clear enough, in fact the two are elaborately intertwined. For Aboriginal people in particular Australia is a place imbued with cultural meanings that are inseparable from its natural values. This deep connection to place has also developed in many other people who belong here.

Types of cultural heritage include:

  • Buildings
  • Relics (both on land and in water)
  • Works
  • Streets
  • Towns
  • Rural landscapes
  • Movable items.



“Places of cultural significance enrich people’s lives, often providing a deep and inspirational sense of connection to community and landscape, to the past and to lived experiences. They are historical records that are important expressions of Australian identity and experience. Places of cultural significance reflect the diversity of our communities, telling us about who we are and the past that has formed us and the Australian landscape. They are irreplaceable and precious.”
— Burra Charter, Australia ICOMOS 2013


Heritage includes places, values, traditions, events and experiences that capture where we've come from, where we are now and gives context to where we are headed as a community.

Our heritage gives us understanding and conveys the stories of our development as a nation, our spirit and ingenuity, and our unique, living landscapes. Heritage is an inheritance that helps define our future.

By identifying, protecting and managing our heritage we are conserving a valuable asset and ensuring that those places will continue to be experienced and enjoyed by future generations.

Our heritage is managed by various levels of government and peak bodies that identify and list places for their heritage values. Significant heritage places are identified and grouped (by type) into lists that guide the protection and management of heritage values.

Reference: Heritage Information Series: A Guide to the Heritage System, NSW Heritage Office



Reference reading

Please visit these links/documents and read the available information:

  • Heritage Information Series: A Guide to the Heritage System, NSW Heritage Office







How do we decide what to keep?

Our environment is constantly changing. We cannot keep everything as a record of the past. We therefore need a process of identifying and assessing items so that we know which are most important to us. “Heritage significance” is a phrase used to describe an item’s value to us in heritage terms. It is important to distinguish its heritage value from other values, such as amenity or utility. For example, a corner store may be very useful to a local community, but this amenity value cannot be used as an argument for its heritage significance. Similarly, an attractive old house may simply be an attractive old house, with minimal heritage significance. Ideas about heritage inevitably change as society’s tastes and values change. Some things inherited from the past will grow in value. Federation architecture was not as highly valued fifty years ago as it is now. The community’s assessment of what is significant is not static. The significance of some items may increase as we learn more about our history. Indeed, historical information is crucial to understanding the context of individual heritage items and why they are important.

Reference: Heritage Information Series: A Guide to the Heritage System, NSW Heritage Office




Environmental and heritage concerns

When you carry out your work you need to be aware of environmental issues such as:

  • Drainage
  • Dust
  • Emissions
  • Flora and fauna
  • Hazardous chemicals
  • Noise
  • Runoff
  • Spills and spill management
  • Water quality.

You also need to think about heritage issues such as:

  • Identification and protection of ancient fossils
  • Protecting culturally sensitive sites and artefacts
  • Heritage legislation
  • Avoiding historical sites or homesteads
  • Avoiding possible indigenous sites.




Heritage risks and opportunities

What are TfNSW’s biggest heritage risks?

  • Spillage
  • Vegetation clearance and impacts on biodiversity
  • Soil contamination, erosion and sediment control
  • Ground Water and Surface Water pollution
  • Community Impacts
  • Heritage impacts
  • Noise and vibration impacts
  • Landscape and Visual impacts
  • Energy usage – the top 140th energy user in Australia
  • Climate change – 99th largest emitter of GHG emissions in Australia
  • Air quality (dust and odour)
  • Large user of materials and resources
  • Waste.



Spillage

Vegetation clearance and impacts on biodiversity

Heritage impacts

Air quality (dust and odour)

Ground water and surface water pollution

Soil contamination, erosion and sediment control

Noise and community impacts

What are TfNSW’s biggest heritage opportunities?

  • Rail transport is one of the most energy efficient modes of transport, thereby assisting to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and transport energy usage
  • Reduce ambient noise levels for our communities and neighbours.
  • Conserve and enhance our heritage assets, in order to improve the customer experience and drive customer growth
  • Provide important corridors for wildlife
  • Improve accessibility and reduce traffic congestion
  • Opportunities for engaging and integrating communities.

Conserve and enhance our heritage assets




Generate own renewable energy

Reduce ambient noise levels for our communities and neighbours


Improve energy and resource efficiency – LED lighting upgrades




Which areas do YOU think we can improve on? We’d like to hear your thoughts.

Share your ideas on the Digital Heritage Academy Discussion Board.


So, which areas do you think WE would like to improve on?

We asked our Heritage Specialists where they thought we were falling behind in terms of heritage performance and this is what they said:

  • XXXX
  • XXXX
  • XXXX






























Welcome to Module 1: About the course


Purpose statement/objective

This course aims to equip participants with the required knowledge and skills to incorporate heritage management practice into planning of works affecting heritage-listed buildings, structures and their surrounds.

Target audience

Middle management and construction professionals such as project managers, individuals involved in strategic asset management decisions, staff conducting project procurement, contract mangers and construction project and site management.

Learners seeking entry to this course are expected to be in a position of authority in regards to project autonomy and/or decision making.

Prerequisites

This course does not have any prerequisites.

Completion commitment

Learners must commit to complete all course requirements (including assessment) within 4 weeks of date of enrolment.

Learning outcomes

At the end of the course, participants will have learned how to:

  • Identify heritage considerations for project integration
  • Identify project opportunities and constraints
  • Plan for heritage compliance
  • Plan for the evaluation of the project’s heritage management.

Assessment strategy

This course has two assessment pathways:

Pathway 1: Learners who have access to a current heritage project

  • Knowledge Assessments
  • Portfolio of Evidence (collection of evidence from current project)
  • Interview with Assessor.

Pathway 2: Learners who do not access to a current heritage project

  • Knowledge Assessments
  • MyProject (structured scenario-based assignment)
  • Interview with Assessor.

You will need to choose which assessment pathway best suits you in your current role and workplace.

Relationship to competency standards

At the successful completion of this course and all assessment requirements, learners will be issued with 10818NAT Apply heritage supervision to project planning.

Learning Pathway

[Insert Learning Pathway here]

We have designed a Learning Pathway for you that enables you to study when and where suits you.


Available support

XXXXXXX


Further information about this course can be found in the Participant Information Handbook. Download it here.

[Insert Participant Information Handbook here]




Why are we here?

Transport for NSW (TfNSW) owns or cares for a large and diverse range of assets (bridges, roads, buildings) which may be of historical significance to the people of NSW.

TfNSW will identify, assess and manage the cultural heritage it owns, controls or affects in accordance with relevant NSW and Federal legislation and will ensure that it is managed and conserved in accordance with its heritage significance.

We are here because some projects have been managed to world class standards BUT there are currently too many heritage incidents (many of which are notifiable to regulators) resulting in:

  • Irreparable damage to sensitive heritage assets
  • Significant financial costs from severe penalties, legal fees, rehabilitation and clean-up etc.
  • Significant reputational damage and poor customer service
  • Legal liability of Roads and Maritime
  • Personal and professional liability of PM’s and employees
  • Stopping or delays to critical works, and poor performance
  • Many PM’s are not fully aware of their heritage obligations/responsibilities, ‘what to do’ and ‘who to go to’
  • Safety is generally well documented and managed by PM’s, but heritage is often a last thought, creating inefficiencies and significant risks to Sydney Trains and employees.

As a TfNSW employee or contractor, you have a number of legal and professional obligations to protect our heritage. We will be exploring these obligations later today.

Let’s look at a few recent heritage incidents:



Incident 1: XXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX



Incident 2: XXXXX
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX





Our impact on heritage

TfNSW activities impact on heritage in the following ways:

1. As an owner of heritage assets

Images: The Sydney Harbour Bridge, Great North Road (convict built), Lady Darling Shipwreck (1880).



Did you know?
NSW Maritime controls 13 listed shipwrecks in Sydney Harbour and Newcastle Harbour.


2. As a developer.

Images: Light Rail construction at George Street and Randwick Stabling Yard.



Did you know?
Over 22, 000 artefacts have been found during Light Rail construction at the Randwick Stabling Yard.




What is heritage?

We all have a personal heritage of places and things that are special to us and our families and friends. The same quality of attachment applies to places valued by our local community, our state, our country and even the whole world. Heritage consists of those things we have inherited and want to keep. These places and objects give us a sense of the past and of our cultural identity. They are the things we want to protect and pass on to future generations so that they too will understand what came before them.

In Australia there are two basic categories of heritage items:

  • Natural
  • Cultural.

Natural heritage refers to the physical forms of the terrestrial and maritime environment. Cultural heritage encompasses the historical evidence, artefacts and beliefs of:

  • Aboriginal peoples
  • People who have had contact with the Australian continent
  • People who have been born here or who have settled here.

Although the distinction between natural and cultural appears clear enough, in fact the two are elaborately intertwined. For Aboriginal people in particular Australia is a place imbued with cultural meanings that are inseparable from its natural values. This deep connection to place has also developed in many other people who belong here.

Types of cultural heritage include:

  • Buildings
  • Relics (both on land and in water)
  • Works
  • Streets
  • Towns
  • Rural landscapes
  • Movable items.



“Places of cultural significance enrich people’s lives, often providing a deep and inspirational sense of connection to community and landscape, to the past and to lived experiences. They are historical records that are important expressions of Australian identity and experience. Places of cultural significance reflect the diversity of our communities, telling us about who we are and the past that has formed us and the Australian landscape. They are irreplaceable and precious.”
— Burra Charter, Australia ICOMOS 2013


Heritage includes places, values, traditions, events and experiences that capture where we've come from, where we are now and gives context to where we are headed as a community.

Our heritage gives us understanding and conveys the stories of our development as a nation, our spirit and ingenuity, and our unique, living landscapes. Heritage is an inheritance that helps define our future.

By identifying, protecting and managing our heritage we are conserving a valuable asset and ensuring that those places will continue to be experienced and enjoyed by future generations.

Our heritage is managed by various levels of government and peak bodies that identify and list places for their heritage values. Significant heritage places are identified and grouped (by type) into lists that guide the protection and management of heritage values.

Reference: Heritage Information Series: A Guide to the Heritage System, NSW Heritage Office



Reference reading

Please visit these links/documents and read the available information:

  • Heritage Information Series: A Guide to the Heritage System, NSW Heritage Office







How do we decide what to keep?

Our environment is constantly changing. We cannot keep everything as a record of the past. We therefore need a process of identifying and assessing items so that we know which are most important to us. “Heritage significance” is a phrase used to describe an item’s value to us in heritage terms. It is important to distinguish its heritage value from other values, such as amenity or utility. For example, a corner store may be very useful to a local community, but this amenity value cannot be used as an argument for its heritage significance. Similarly, an attractive old house may simply be an attractive old house, with minimal heritage significance. Ideas about heritage inevitably change as society’s tastes and values change. Some things inherited from the past will grow in value. Federation architecture was not as highly valued fifty years ago as it is now. The community’s assessment of what is significant is not static. The significance of some items may increase as we learn more about our history. Indeed, historical information is crucial to understanding the context of individual heritage items and why they are important.

Reference: Heritage Information Series: A Guide to the Heritage System, NSW Heritage Office




Environmental and heritage concerns

When you carry out your work you need to be aware of environmental issues such as:

  • Drainage
  • Dust
  • Emissions
  • Flora and fauna
  • Hazardous chemicals
  • Noise
  • Runoff
  • Spills and spill management
  • Water quality.

You also need to think about heritage issues such as:

  • Identification and protection of ancient fossils
  • Protecting culturally sensitive sites and artefacts
  • Heritage legislation
  • Avoiding historical sites or homesteads
  • Avoiding possible indigenous sites.




Heritage risks and opportunities

What are TfNSW’s biggest heritage risks?

  • Spillage
  • Vegetation clearance and impacts on biodiversity
  • Soil contamination, erosion and sediment control
  • Ground Water and Surface Water pollution
  • Community Impacts
  • Heritage impacts
  • Noise and vibration impacts
  • Landscape and Visual impacts
  • Energy usage – the top 140th energy user in Australia
  • Climate change – 99th largest emitter of GHG emissions in Australia
  • Air quality (dust and odour)
  • Large user of materials and resources
  • Waste.



Spillage

Vegetation clearance and impacts on biodiversity

Heritage impacts

Air quality (dust and odour)

Ground water and surface water pollution

Soil contamination, erosion and sediment control

Noise and community impacts

What are TfNSW’s biggest heritage opportunities?

  • Rail transport is one of the most energy efficient modes of transport, thereby assisting to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and transport energy usage
  • Reduce ambient noise levels for our communities and neighbours.
  • Conserve and enhance our heritage assets, in order to improve the customer experience and drive customer growth
  • Provide important corridors for wildlife
  • Improve accessibility and reduce traffic congestion
  • Opportunities for engaging and integrating communities.

Conserve and enhance our heritage assets




Generate own renewable energy

Reduce ambient noise levels for our communities and neighbours


Improve energy and resource efficiency – LED lighting upgrades




Which areas do YOU think we can improve on? We’d like to hear your thoughts.

Share your ideas on the Digital Heritage Academy Discussion Board.


So, which areas do you think WE would like to improve on?

We asked our Heritage Specialists where they thought we were falling behind in terms of heritage performance and this is what they said:

  • XXXX
  • XXXX
  • XXXX